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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
starts us off. >> reporter: it's been four days since hurricane sandy struck the northeast. yesterday there were screams for help in some of the worst hit areas. >> we all need help. i need help desperately. >> reporter: today, some help showed up. homeland security secretary janet napolitano toured devastated staten island. >> we have 3200 fema personnel working this storm in the northeast, and more are on their way. >> reporter: tons of relief supplies were brought into floyd bennett field in brooklyn. national guardsmen and the red cross seemed a lot more visible and fema set up relief centers throughout the storm zone. >> fema was very helpful. they came out. we were in need of clothes. in need of food. and any donation that the people have given us, we're very grateful. >> reporter: because supplies and emergency services have been at such a premium, new yorkers have wondered all week why on earth the stay's legendary marathon was still on schedule to take place sunday. early this evening, it was canceled. and on staten island, where the race always begins, residents said thank g
first prime time interview, a "dateline" exclusive. lauren and her family take us back to that terrible night and through her incredible recovery. here is natalie morales. >> reporter: just a year ago, lauren scruggs' future was bright. the beautiful girl her friends called "lolo" had big plans and even bigger dreams, as she pursued a career in fashion. >> i am lauren scruggs with "lolo" mag. >> at 23, she started "lolo" magazine, a website covering beauty, fitness and fashion around the world. >> hi, i'm lauren scruggs and we're excited to be here today at new york fashion week. >> reporter: lauren grew up in dallas, texas. her parents divorced when she was young, but would later remarry after seven years apart. their experience inspired their work today as marriage counselors. their greatest joy, twin daughters, brittney and lauren. lauren's father, jeff, says lauren always sparkled. >> there's a spirit about her that is just -- it's contagious. that she's just so full of life. >> reporter: but in one awful moment last december, everything changed for lauren and her family. it's the s
these other things preoccupied us for some time. you can only, looking back, see those 20 debates that bushed everybody, including romney who became a moderate much too late to get that nomination. >> it is still striking. you have some 70% in the exit polls who believe the economy is in bad shape, 52% who feel like the country is off on the wrong direction. a lot of opposition thought to president obama and his policies and yet he prevails because of a coalition ever expanding that believes in a certain role for government, bob, that is opposed to where the republicans would like to take it. >> i think the big picture here is that president obama has got to deliver on the big issue, which is fixing the financial house of the u.s. federal government, it is in disarray, not just the fiscal cliff but $16 trillion in ious out in the world. in a couple of months, in february or march, they are going to have to renegotiate borrowing authority for another trillion or two dollars and if the president can fix and put us on some sort of path of restoration for the economy, that is a pay juv for everyo
again, i'm waking up again. >> america now, lost in suburbia. >> thanks for joining us. i'm lester holt. many of us have a lot to be thankful for today, but even as the u.s. economy starts to sputter back to life, millions of americans remain unemployed and they're suffering. many find themselves falling out of the middle class and falling into poverty. there are more people living in the suburbs than in cities and we have been following three families as they confronted poverty. they face losing their homes and their future, yet never losing themselves. diane is the kind of do it all mom you often meet in the affluent suburbs of boulder, colorado. >> we're going to get some groceries. pasta, rice. cereal. a gallon of milk possibly and eggs. >> she's an ambitious human resource executive with a master's degree, a husband, three kids. and a comfortable home. so what is diane doing here? >> you're entitled to the government commodity today. can you use rice krispies? >> yeah. >> and a food pantry. >> i never thought we'd be in this predicament so many unknowns. >> they didn't see it comin
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. what do you know about your ancestors? a lot of us may not know much before our grandparents. the young woman in tonight's story didn't even know that. she started a search and crossed paths with a hollywood producer who was on a mission of his own. their journey took them to the deep south at a violent time during the battle for civil rights. on an old film, an nbc documentary in fact, they uncovered an explosive family secret. now keep in mind as you watch, that film is almost 50 years old, and some of the words spoken openly back then we find offensive today. the mississippi delta is nearly 2,000 miles from the hollywood hills where ray grew up and now works as a filmmaker. it's a lifetime away from the phoenix neighborhood where yvette johnson is raising her boys, and yet a year ago, these two strangers, both bent on unraveling personal family mysteries, discovered they shared a unique bond. >> living now in greenwood -- >> it was a bond rooted in a 1966 nbc news documentary about race relations in mississippi. >> the people in other sections of the country are thoroughly convinced
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, and i could not have done it without armando and using his techniques. we have been using armando's techniques to buy and sell properties. he has taught us how to determine the after repair value of the house. how much repair needs to be done. and through everything we learned through armando our first 2 properties have netted $53,000 profit. and has given us a future to count on, we can do this for a living now. thanks to armando i'm a professional of 32 years we've been attending armanda's live seminars. we currently have 2 properties under contract the opportunity has given me for working with my son what i was doing before this he wouldn't... and it's just fantastic. the environment that armondo creates for learing this stuff. he gave me the confidence to even believe that i could do this and his methodological approach to teaching is just fantastic, it's step by step. i'm one of those people that needs 99% of the information before i think i can do it. and and act on it. and he provided all that. the teaching really does go back to the basics you know abcs, 123s it makes it v
door. it shocked us out of bed. i went downstairs and, you know, there were police. it was hard to process that this had happened. i still kept thinking they couldn't have gotten it right. >> reporter: bernadette had to tell her parents. >> i said what, what happened to her? was she in an accident? i told her to be careful, you know. i was just shocked and crying. >> i felt so bad and so weak and it was just shocking. >> reporter: back in connecticut, stamford police were getting a surprisingly different vibe from annalisa's boyfriend, nelson. >> was she emotional? >> if he was, he didn't show it to us. >> did he ask what happened to annalisa? >> never to us. >> no, not at all. >> never to us. in fact went to sleep. >> he went to sleep? >> went to sleep in the boathouse. >> as seasoned detectives, what did that say to you? >> it raised a big flag with us. big red flag with us. >> makes you wonder, did nelson know more than he was telling police about the murder of his girlfriend? and what would have been his motive for murder? no one could figure it out, especially his friends.
, where everybody used to know everybody -- >> it's not that way anymore. so many different people are moving in from around the world and trying to escape the crowds. escape the crowd or running from something. >> where have you gone, andy griffith? mayberry has up and left us. >> the crimes you see here are the same crimes you'll see in any city just a smaller version. >> still, neighbors tend to know more of each other's business than they do up in tuscaloosa, which could be a bit of a nuisance, as you're about to see, if you need to keep a secret. especially, for example, if your secret is about murder. to begin with, this young woman was just a girl of 17 back in '07 when things started coming apart in a way things do when parents don't talk about it. kelsey mayfield saw that troubled look in her mom's eyes, mostly, her mother, theresa. >> i could tell she was stressed. >> was it clear what she was stre stressed about? >> money would be the main thing. she just wanted to be sure she had enough money to take care of her family. >> a lot of that going around, of course. moundvil
. the ballad of mike and dalia. is thanks for joining us, i'm lester holt. >>> their lives appeared to be picture perfect, a young couple with flourishing careers, a luxury condo and a baby on the way. then, it all came apart, an investigation would reveal nothing about this young husband and wife was what it seemed and the final chapter in this case would take nearly everyone by surprise. here's dennis murphy. ♪ >> reporter: palm beach county, florida cab bad place to live if you suffer from the "i want me some of that." the cars, the polazzos on the water, a conspicuous consumption and envy index as high as the humidity. >> within touching distance, all of that great, great wealth. >> it s range roefrts in front of you and behind you at the stoplight. wonderful, pricey restaurants. luxury hotels. for a person who has a propensity for greed, it is either the perfect place for them to live, as it tickles their greed, or the worst place. >> reporter: which bring us to our newlyweds you are about to meet, dalia and mike dip politte toe. they had big dreams, like any couple young and
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that. >> and how did they get it on camera? "extreme escapes caught on tape." >>> thanks for joining us, everyone. i'm lester holt. you think you get wild on the weekend? you're about to see some of the most amazing moments of athletic adventure ever caught on tape. they're more than extreme. they are white knuckle life and death situations. danger is just the start of it. you'll watch this but still you won't believe these guys escaped alive. like the b.a.s.e. jumper who leaps from bridges and buildings and everything else. he decided to try a new trick off a sheer ledge turned out to be one crazy cliff-hanger. >> ready, set, let's go. >> my name is ted davenport. i'm a professional skier and b.a.s.e. jumper. i've jumped all over the world. i've b.a.s.e. jumped in united states, noourp, new zealand. the thrill of it is hard to describe. you're falling towards the earth. it's that surreal of not being in control but being in control. there's kind of a balance. you're really close to possibly not living, but you are living. sports that involve a high amount of risk usually have a high pa
. >> mrs. jesse came to the station with us said she wanted to help solve the murder of her husband. >> and she told him about life with jack. married 14 years, blended family, four kids between them. jack was a patriarch in the jesse clan, she said. a teddy bear of a man, well liked, well to do. >> jack was a very loving person who doetd on his children, doted on his stepchildren, doted on his grandchildren. >> but jack was ill house bound after colon cancer surgery. she had been running a bit of a mercy mission for jack and dawdled too long at the mall. >> she was very specific about where she had gone at what times and why she had gone there. >> as for cheryl, she told detectives she'd do anything to find out what happened to her dad in those 15 minutes she was away from the house. >> her actions were consistent with somebody who understands the police are looking at me right now. i know i didn't do anything. i'm going to do everything ki to give full disclosure. >> and then after the murder, a guy walked into a bar, sat down on the bar stool and told the bar tender a story. abou
. >> the night lindsay disappeared. thanks for joining us. i'm lester holt. it stumped police for years, the case of a young missing college who went missing. they finally get their big break from a very small thing. take a look at this photo. there's a key clue here, a single detail spotted by an eagle eye detective. that's what helped him turn this nine-year mystery into a slam-dunk case. watch now and see exactly how he did it. here's josh mankiewicz. >> sometimes the facts are as clear as the southern california sky, but other times you have to know where to look to see the truth. this man has made a career of noticing what others do not. >> what's his reputation? >> meticulous investigator. just pores over the volume of evidence and found what others did not find. >> the evidence whisperer? >> correct. >> at night i went out dancing. >> does this man act guilty? does he know more than he's saying. >> i didn't know anything was going on, all right? >> what about this man? can you believe the story he's telling? >> i was supposed to pick her up twice and she was so out of character, she didn't
. >> keith morrison with deadly conspiracy. thanks for joining us. i'm lester holt. when someone is murdered and the killer is still free, families never give up hope, and a good detective never gives up looking. this murder case was tougher than most. the trail was as cold as it gets and the killer left behind no physical evidence. it was the kind of evidence no detective likes but one detective lived for. here's keith morrison. >> the game is called mousetrap. the little ball on its track, the tiny mice which unless every lever works in unison will not be caught, and how often things go wrong to allow the mice to get away. so awed that what really happened could so eerily mimic a children's game. these are the people it happened to. the jessee clan of california. they vacationed together, shared birthdays, even got together for a monthly game of ten pin. but what these grainy home videos don't show is what is yet to come. which is murder, conspiracy. one branch of the family against the other. a game so twisted, mice so clever, that crafting a trap to catch them might just be impossible. t
. >> barbara britton is in the middle. >> buried secrets. >>> thanks for joining us. i'm lester holt. for the woman at the center of the story her son disappeared and wasn't a shred of evidence of what happened to him. she may never have known his fate if not for a quick thinking rookie detective whose tools included the internet and some plain old common sense. but to solve the cold case, she would also need the help of a killer. here's keith morrison. >> it's a strange thing that happens among the marshes, the soft soil here in coastal florida. things have a way of coming up. things buried in the ground and the past, or both. it was july of 2003, beaches quiet, snow birds back up north. no one noticed first what was started inland in a town called pembroke pines where donna, a rookie really, just been assigned a cold case unit. >> the sergeant came into the office and dropped a box of papers right on my desk and said here, what see what you can do with this. i began to wonder, is this a test to see, could she really do this? >> but the case was a challenge was an understatement. no
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)